No Greater Love: The Memoirs of Séamus Kearney

(3 customer reviews)

£19.99

Séamus Kearney

15 sa stoc (can be backordered)

SKU: 29852 Catagóirí: ,

Cur síos

Having been born into a sectarian and brutally oppressive state, Seamus Kearney became a child soldier at the age of 15. Eventually, having worked his way through the ranks, he became a staff officer in the Irish Republican Army (Provisional IRA).

In 1977, he was captured on active service by British Crown Forces and was sentenced to 14 years imprisonment. Refusing to wear the uniform of a criminal, he was sent to the notorious H-Blocks of Long Kesh, where he spent over four years on the blanket protest fighting against Britain’s criminalisation policy.

He was subjected to protracted periods of torture, total sensory deprivation and spent several spells in the punishment block, on a bread and water diet.

He befriended Bobby Sands and Brendan Hughes (The Dark), and was an eyewitness to the 1981 hunger strike, which saw ten of his comrades lose their lives.

He, along with over 300 comrades, was taken to the outer rim of humanity, a journey so cataclysmic that some would never recover from the ordeal.

This is a story of extreme violence, incredible courage, grit determination and an indomitable spirit which refused to be crushed in the face of a draconian penal regime.

It is a story of triumph over adversity, an intensely human story of comradeship, brotherhood, loyalty to a cause, and a victory achieved against all odds.

The reader needs to prepare for a unique journey into the abyss, a journey which contains two polar opposites – the stark inhumanity of man, compared to the humanity among comrades, who became brothers and laid down their lives for one another.

No Greater Love….

Séamus Kearney’s powerful and moving book charts the years of turbulence caused by Britain’s vain attempts at criminalising the Republican struggle in Ireland, which culminated in the deaths of ten republican prisoners.

This is a journey into the depths of oppression and the soaring heights of human resistance and resilience.

Anyone wishing to gain an insight into the epic struggle of the Blanket Protest and Hunger Strike of 1981 needs this book on their shelf.

Jake MacSiacais

Eolas breise

Meachán 640 g
Toisí 210 × 147 × 30 mm

3 reviews for No Greater Love: The Memoirs of Séamus Kearney

  1. Francis mezza

    This book was written brilliantly and it takes you right to the very heart of the H blocks. Seamus Kearney describes in great detail the horrific treatment that the republican prisoners endured during the hunger strikes. The strong bond between these men was very clear after reading No Greater Love . I found it very difficult to put the book down.

  2. Bernadette Boyle

    I have just finished reading Seamus Kearney’s book, “No Greater Love”, and have every intention of reading it again. I was totally absorbed in it and became quite emotional in parts. It is an outstanding piece of work, providing the reader with an incredible insight into the sheer inhumanity which the Blanket Men endured in the H Blocks. Also the comradeship, determination, courage and resilience which were shown by them all, in the struggle to regain political status. Our Hunger Strikers paid the ultimate price. Total respect. I would recommend this book to anyone who is serious in wanting to know the true story about the protests, and the Hunger Strikers behind the walls of the H Blocks. An excellent book all round.

  3. Denis Grace (verified owner)

    I’ve read many books on the H Block prison struggle, and seen the films; but this book was so much more of an emotional experience for me. I had to brace myself before each chapter, as I was taken,with him, into such a dark and fearful place, that is hard to contemplate.

    Seamus Kearney writes beautifully, describing how he had to dig deeper than most humans could even imagine.
    He portrays vividly, the degradation and torture he and other non-conforming prisoners went through at the hands of the prison wardens, who were given carte blanche to do everything they could to get the 300 or so men (or “Spartans” as he refers to them) to come off their blanket and no wash protest, so they could be criminalised.

    They tortured the prisoners to what they thought was the limit of human endurance, but utimately failed. The prisoners endured it and , some, came through it, at a heavy price, for truth, and for their brotherly love towards each other.

Add a review

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.